Bombay Street Food Special #13 – Dal Vada

As a food blogger, someone who loves learning new things and basically a lover of good food, I have an ever-growing list of ‘Recipes to try’ and ‘food I’d love to learn how to make’. And that list grows like it has a life of its own. Just the other day, my husband, in all innocence asked me what I would do when I ran out of recipes to share on the blog. My response – I laughed. He thought I’d lost it. Then I showed him just a glimpse of these lists and he knew it wasn’t going to happen any time soon. 

Today’s recipe is one I’ve wanted to try even before I’d started any of these lists. You see, Dal Vadas are easily available street food in Bombay. These aren’t as popular as Idlis and Medhu Vadas (South Indian Food), but I’ve always had a soft corner for this treat. These deep fried dumplings are made from split and hulled chickpeas aka Chana Dal, easily found in any Indian grocery store in the aisle with the lentils. They are everything I love in a snack, small portion size, crispy on the outside and chock full of flavor. 
The recipe I tried is a little different from the commonly found Dal Vada. It is amped up with some Garam Masala (an Indian spice blend) and fennel seeds, which you typically don’t find in the Street Food variety, I must admit it adds a lot of flavor. You could skip the fennel for a more tradition version of the vada. I couldn’t believe how easy it was to make. You could serve this with your favorite chutneys like this Green Mint Chutney (Pudiney ki chutney) and this Tamarind and Date Chutney (Imli ki chutney), or you could just serve it with some Tomato Ketchup. Or be like me, throw caution to the wind and serve it up with all three for a little variety. Whichever way you decide to go, I hope you try it out. 
Dal Vada
Adapted from: Swasthi’s Recipes
 
1 cup chana dal
Salt, to taste
1″ cinnamon
1-2 dried red chillies
3/4 tsp cumin seeds
3/4 tsp fennel seeds 
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1-2 sprigs curry leaves, roughly torn / chopped
1/2 tsp ginger paste
1/2 tsp garlic paste
1-2 green chillies, finely chopped
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
Oil, for deep frying
Wash the chana dal a couple of times and drain the water. 
Soak the dal in fresh water for an hour and a half. Make sure there is ample water in the bowl. after soaking drain the dal thoroughly using a colander.
Grind the cinnamon, red chillies, cumin and fennel to a coarse powder. 
Keep this aside along with 2 tbsp of the chana dal.
Grind the rest of the drained dal and salt by using the ‘Pulse’ function on your blender to grind it coarsely and transfer to a bowl. 
To the bowl, add the curry leaves, onion, coarsely ground spices, green chillies and the reserved dal and mix it all well. 
Heat the oil for deep frying. 
To shape the vadas, roll a golf ball size of the mix to a ball and flatten them. 
Deep fry on medium heat till golden brown on both sides. (Using high heat will just brown the outside and leave the inside uncooked, so be sure to fry it on a medium heat.)
Drain and place on some kitchen paper to absorb any excess oil.
Serve hot with either chutney or ketchup.
Enjoy hot with a steaming cup of tea !!!
Click here for some more Bombay Street Food options.

Bombay Street Food Special #12 – Papdi Chaat

Now that you can make the very tantalizing Sev Puri at home, I’m eager to show you how to step this already amazing treat up a notch, into something spectacular. The trick is adding a little whipped yogurt. That’s it. So basically, without the yogurt you have what we call Sev Puri and with the yogurt, you have a completely different treat called Papdi Chaat. That’s how easy and simple it is.

The trick to a good papdi chaat is getting the right balance with the whipped yogurt. Unfortunately, there is no accurate measure here, because the tartness of the yogurt varies greatly. You could use regular pot set yogurt or greek yogurt here, either way, it has to be plain, unflavored and unsweetened yogurt. I start off with half a cup of yogurt for a single plate of chaat or 1 cup for 2 plates or portions. Trust me here, you’d rather have more of the whipped yogurt dip at hand, instead of falling short or running out of it.

So let’s get straight to it then. The list below is an approximation. You add as much or as little of each of the ingredients to suit your preferences. The quantities below make one plate or 1 portion. You can easily double or multiply the quantities to make more. Also I used chickpeas here, you could use boiled potato instead or a combination of both.

Papdi Chaat
For 1 portion

6-7 puris (also called Papdi)
1/2 cup boiled / canned chickpeas, roughly mashed
1/4 onion, finely chopped
1/4 tomato, finely diced
Mint Chutney (You can find the recipe here)
Date and Tamarind Chutney (You can find the recipe here)
Sev
Fresh coriander, chopped
Some chaat masala / amchur (dried mango) powder
1/2 cup plain, unflavoured and unsweetened yogurt
A pinch of salt
Sugar, to taste (superfine sugar)

To make this chaat, start off my making the yogurt whip. The mixed yogurt needs to sit for about 5 minutes for the flavor to develop.

Place the yogurt, a scant pinch of salt and 1 tsp sugar and stir together to combine. Taste and add more sugar if you need to. You are looking for a slightly tangy, slightly sweet taste with a faint hint of saltiness as well. If your yogurt is not too tart, start with 1/2 tsp sugar and add more if needed. Set the bowl aside while you assemble the chaat.

Place your puris on your serving plate.

(These puris can be made at home. I haven’t tried making them yet. For now, I use the store bought version. I get mine in packets that look like the one below).

Over the puris, arrange the mashed chickpeas in a layer. Unfortunately I don’t have a picture of the chickpeas layer but here’s one of the boiled potato slices. The trick here too is to not overload the puris. They will get difficult to manage.

Top that with the chopped onion. Use as much or as little as you like. But make sure you use some.

Top this with some chopped tomato.

Now add your green mint chutney. I would start of with small quantities of this as this is on the spicy side.

Now you add the Date and Tamarind Chutney. This is the sweet and tangy stuff, so feel free to add some.

At this stage, add a dollop of the whipped yogurt on each puri. I like a little extra yogurt on mine, but go with what you think you’d enjoy.

The next layer uses sev. Sev is basically little fried crispy noodles made out of chickpea flour. Again, this can be made at home, but I haven’t tried that yet. I simply use a store bought packet.

Add a layer of the sev to the puris.

It’s almost done. But there are a couple of flourishes that will take this treat to a whole new level. Sprinkle the puris with a pinch of chaat masala / amchur powder. Use this sparingly as a little goes a long way. Lastly garnish with some freshly chopped coriander.

Serve immediately.

There is only one way to eat these puris. You get a whole puri with its toppings in your mouth at one go.

Bombay Street Food Special #11 – Sev Puri

Yup that’s right! You thought I had given up on my Bombay Street Food Series, didn’t you? The good news is that I haven’t. I just don’t always remember to take a picture when I make some of these. This time I did. So I can finally share one of my favorites with you. Sev Puri – Sev is just the almost super thin fried noodle like crunchy topping and Puri the flat disc that it sits on. This Sev Puri falls into a broader category of street food called Chaat, which also includes Bhel Puri, Paani Puri and many more. I love them all. Infact everytime I go back home, I have to go get some almost the day I get there. There is only one vendor close to where I grew up that I will ever go to. No one can beat his Chaat in taste. I should check if he’s willing to make an appearance on the blog, when I go there next. You have to be careful about where you get your Chaat fix from because of overall hygiene levels of street food in Bombay. But this guy, I can swear by. We’ve been frequenting his little stall since he started his business, about 30 years ago. If you’re skeptical about enjoying these on the street or don’t have access to a vendor like this, with a little planning you can enjoy a fantastic version at home.

This little treat is basically an Indian version of nachos, except that these are individually topped with all the fun stuff. The way you eat this is you pick up one Puri and try not to drop off any of the toppings and the whole things goes into your mouth at one go. What you end up with is an explosion of flavors and textures. It is literally a party in your mouth. To make these puris, you’ll need to have some boiled potato at hand. You will also need a couple of chutneys. From time to time I make these chutneys at home (I’ll add the link in the recipe below), but this time around I’d run out of the home made version and used store bought chutneys. You should be able to find all of the ingredients in your local Indian grocery store. I do hope you try these out. These are best eaten as soon as they are assembled, otherwise they tend to go soggy. You will also notice that your second and third attempts will be better than your first one, because these babies are all about a balance of flavors. Once you’ve tried them, you’ll know what you want to increase or decrease the next time around. The quantities below are not fixed, you can add more or less of any of them to suit your taste. Each plate typically serves one and can easily be doubled or multiplied. The quantities below make 1 plate.

Sev Puri
Serves 1

6-7 puris (also called Papdi)
1 potato, boiled and thinly sliced
1/4 onion, finely chopped
1/4 tomato, finely diced
Mint Chutney (You can find the recipe here)
Date and Tamarind Chutney (You can find the recipe here)
Sev
Fresh coriander, chopped
Some chaat masala / amchur (dried mango) powder
A few drops of freshly squeezed lime juice

Place your puris on your serving plate.

(These puris can be made at home. I haven’t tried making them yet. For now, I use the store bought version. I get mine in packets that look like the one below).

Over the puris, arrange a layer of the boiled potato slices. Don’t overload the puris. They will get difficult to manage.

Top that with the chopped onion. Use as much or as little as you like. But make sure you use some.

Top this with some chopped tomato.

Now add your green mint chutney. I would start of with small quantities of this as this is on the spicy side.

Now you add the Date and Tamarind Chutney. This is the sweet and tangy stuff, so feel free to add some.

The next layer uses sev. Sev is basically little fried crispy noodles made out of chickpea flour. Again, this can be made at home, but I haven’t tried that yet. I simply use a store bought packet.

Add a layer of the sev to the puris.

It’s almost done. But there are a couple of flourishes that will take this treat to a whole new level. Sprinkle the puris with a pinch of chaat masala / amchur powder. Use this sparingly as a little goes a long way. Add a few drops of freshly squeezed lime juice. Again with the lime juice, less is more. You can add a bit, taste and add more if needed. However, if you add too much there is no way to balance it out. Lastly garnish with some freshly chopped coriander.

Serve immediately and get ready to be very popular with anyone you might serve this to.

There is only one way to eat these puris. You get a whole puri with its toppings in your mouth at one go.

Bombay Street Food Special #10 – Dahi wada

2 posts in 2 days …. your probably wondering if thats even possible. I know I am. But I am going to find the time to catch up with my posts from now on. So, thank you for sticking around and being so patient. You will find more regular posts here from now on, compared to the last couple of months. I have been cooking and baking a whole lot, I just haven’t had the time to share it with you. But fingers crossed, thats going to change.

Okay, so yesterday, I shared with you a treat that I’ve only recently learned to make, the humble cruchy vadas or deep friend lentil fritters. We enjoyed these so much, I decided to try and use these in another popular Indian treat, the Dahi wada. (Dahi-meaning yogurt and wada – fritters). Essentially, Dahi wadas are little fritters dunked in some seasoned yogurt with a little flavoring to take it to that next level of yum. 
I know that the dahi wada purists will frown on my method, but it works for me and it is really delicious. Delicious enough to have converted an aunt of mine who was visiting. She never has dahi wadas when it is up for grabs at parties, buffets or at Indian restaurants because of a couple of unpleasant experiences she’s had previously. She claimed that these looked fantastic and she couldn’t go past it without trying some and turns out she loved it. I even gave her some to take home and enjoy later. 
What I did was, made up one batch of the the lentil fritters. We had half of it with some chutney and I used the other half to make these dahi wadas. 
This is not an exact recipe, but some guidelines. You need to tweak it to suit your liking. Its a little sweet, a little savory and a little tangy all at the same time.
In this instance, I used some store bought freeze dried coriander since I could not get my hands on any fresh coriander. But use fresh if you can. I’m happy to have found this little treasure pot. I keep one at hand for times when I can’t find the fresh stuff.  
Another time saver is this bottled Date and Tamarind Chutney, found at any Indian store in Sydney. Again, I’d prefer to use a home made variant, which is tastier and has better consistency, but if you’re in a pinch, this will work fine. If you’d like to make your own little jar at home, you can find the recipe here – Tamarind and Date Chutney.
Now on to the Dahi wada. Here’s what the end result will look like – delish!
Dahi Wada

Deep-fried lentil fritters
A bowl of hot water
1 tub of Greek yogurt
Salt, to taste
Sugar, to taste
Red Chilly powder, to taste
Cumin powder, to taste
Tamarind Date Chutney, to drizzle over, to taste
Fresh coriander chopped/ freeze dried coriander, to garnish
Mint Chutney (Not used here, but can be used, if desired, to taste)
Take hot water in a large bowl.
Dunk the warm wadas in the water and keep it submerged in the water for a little while (1/2 a minute or so) till it has absorbed a fair bit of water. 
Place the soaked wada between the palms of both hands and press firmly to drain all the water out. (We do this to get rid of any excess oil as well as to make the wada more absorbent – that way it takes in more flavor of the yogurt.) Continue with the rest of the fritters. Place in the serving dish or platter in a single layer.
In a large bow, beat the yogurt. Add salt to taste and some sugar. It should lightly sweeten the yogurt but not make it too sweet. Add a splash of water and whisk the yogurt. You need to add the water gradually till you get a thick pouring consistency. (Somewhat like a pouring custard consistency.) In all, you need enough yogurt to cover the fritters completely and generously.
Pour this yogurt over the fritters till you have covered them well. 
Sprinkle some red chilly powder, cumin powder and drizzle some Tamarind Date Chutney and Mint Chutney (not used here but can be added if desired) over. 
Garnish with a sprinkling of chopped coriander.
Refrigerate for a little while, atleast half an hour to let the flavors build and then serve chilled.
This makes a nice refreshing snack for a warm summers day, or if you are like me, its perfect any day of the year.    
Enjoy!
NOTE: This is NOT a sponsored post. I haven’t been approached or compensated by Gourmet Garden or Pattu or any stores that stock them. These are just products that I happen to be using at the moment and work well for me.

Bombay Street Food Special #9 – Deep-fried Lentil Fritters

After what seems like forever, I’m back in the blogosphere. And I just have to share this little treat with you. It is a South-Indian delight. We’ve been missing the readily available street food in Mumbai an awful lot lately, so I’ve decided that instead of whining about it, I was just going to have to put my big girl pants on and learn how to make it myself.

So off I went, to scour the internet for recipes easy enough for a beginner in South Indian food to get right. You might wonder what I’m on about. You see I love South Indian treats, but a lot of them call for the perfect ratio of ingredients, overnight fermentation and consistency of the batter, to name a few pressure points you might come across in a recipe. I wanted something that wouldn’t take as long. After a little looking, I found a recipe for Deep-fried lentil fritters. It requires a little planning in advance, since the lentils have to soak for a while (you could make the Chutney and the prep the other ingredients in the meanwhile), but other than that its fairly simple to prepare. The fritters turned out fantastic. Crunchy on the outside, fluffy on the inside and they packed some lovely flavor. I should tell you at this point, that the first time I made these fritters, the batter was a little thinner than it should have been. The resulting fritters were tasty but absorbed a little oil while they were being fried. I knew at once that I needed to make some changes. When I made these a second time and watched the water content closely. The batter was a lot thicker than the previous time. 
And since then I’ve made these a couple of times and they hit the spot every single time. So until I learn to make a few more Indian street food delights, I will make these bite sized treats everytime the we’re hit with the craving for some South Indian food.
I’ve used a bit of chillies with the seeds since we like our food with a little bite. But you can either cut down on the chillies or leave them out completely. Serve this hot with some Coconut Chutney on a wet / cold day or any other day really coupled with a piping hot cuppa tea and you’re in for a real treat. 

Come back tomorrow and I’ll show you how to use these fritters to make another yummy snack. 

Deep-fried Lentil Fritters
Recipe from: Cooking is Easy
1 cup Urad Dal, black lentils (skinned and split)
1/4 onion, finely chopped
2 green chillies, finely chopped
1/4 tsp. freshly crushed black pepper
1 sprig curry leaves, roughly torn or chopped
2 tbsp rice flour
Salt, to taste
Oil, for deep frying
Wash the dal a couple of times in water and drain.
Soak the dal in water for 20 minutes.
Drain the water. Rinse the dal through with fresh water again and drain.
Grind the dal with a tiny bit of water to a smooth paste. Remember, to not add too much water. You don’t want a thin runny batter.
In a bowl, mix the paste, salt and rice flour. Add the onions, chillies, pepper and curry leaves and stir through, to mix the ingredients evenly.
Heat the oil in a wok to deep fry.
When the oil is hot, ladle the batter carefully into the oil one tablespoonful at a time and keep the oil on a medium heat. Fry the fritters till golden brown.
Drain the fritters onto some kitchen paper to absorb any excess oil. 
Enjoy hot with some Coconut Chutney and a hot cuppa tea.

Bombay Street Food Special #8 – Sabudana Vada

Some of you know that in the past few posts, I’ve tried a few new things with a view to using up what was in the pantry, since we were going to move. These little gems were the result of one such experiment in my kitchen. I’m a big fan of sabudana (globally known tapioca pearls) preparations. I’ve had a few of them in the form of Kheer (sweet pudding), Khitchdi (savoury stir-fry) and these Vadas (fritters). I’d bought a packet of these pearls in the hopes of making all of these in my own kitchen at home. I didn’t have too much luck with the Khitchdi, but these Vadas were superb. They were beautifully flavourful, nice and crunchy on the outside and would be great as a snack served with some ketchup or green chutney or as a side dish as part of a meal too. I’m happy I got around to trying these.

When going through Kanan’s blog, I learnt that there are different varieties of sabudana. Some need to be soaked for just 2-3 hours, others overnight, depending on the quality of the pearls. Mine was good to go in about 2 and a half hours. When you soak the pearls, it is best to use a wide, shallow dish for this. If you’re not sure how long your sabudana needs to be soaked, so what I did the first time around. Check on them every now and then. When you press a pearl between your fingers, it should mash easily, that’s when you know they are done. Do not oversoak as the pearls will just get mushy and you don’t want that to happen.

Sabudana Vadas
Recipe from: Spice Up the Curry
Yields about 20 vadas

3/4 cup Sabudana
2 medium sized potatoes, boiled, peeled and mashed (1 1/2 cup)
1/2 cup roasted peanuts
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 1/2 tsp ginger, finely chopped
5-6 green chillies, finely chopped (Or to taste)
10 sprigs fresh coriander, finely chopped
1 tsp lemon juice
Salt, to taste
Oil, for deep frying

Wash the sabudana under cold, running water, till the water runs clear.

Soak in a shallow dish till done. (See information above the picture.) The pearls will more than double in size so use a dish size that will accommodate this.

Drain the water and leave the pearls in a colander for about 10 minutes.

Roughly chop the roasted peanuts.

Place all the ingredients in a large bowl and mix till everything is well incorporated and form into a ball.

Heat the oil for deep frying. To check if the oil is hot enough, carefully place a small portion of a the mix in the oil. If it rises to the top immediately, you are good to go.

Grease your palms with a little oil, to avoid the mix sticking to your hands.

Take portions of the mix and shape them into little patties, round and flat.

Gently slide the patties into the oil, and fry till they are golden brown on both sides, on medium heat.
Do not overcrowd the pan that you are deep frying in.

Drain them on a paper towel lined plate to do away with the excess oil.

Serve them hot, with some ketchup or green chutney (coriander or mint) and a cup of hot tea.

Perfect snack for evenings when its raining or cold outsides. Alternatively, you can also serve these as part of a larger meal.

Enjoy!

 

Notes:

  • After shaping a few of the vadas, if the mix starts sticking to your hands, wash your hands, wipe dry, grease your palms lightly again and continue.
  • If the oil is not hot enough, the vadas will either fall apart in the oil or will soak up too much oil when frying.
  • Once the vadas are place in the oil, do not disturb them for about a minute. If they are disturbed, they could break up and absorb a lot more oil than they should.
  • These vadas are nice and crispy on the outside, if stored and reheated, they will lose their crispness to an extent.
  • Between batches while frying, let the temperature of the oil come back up before you can add the next lot. Do not overcrowd the pan.

Chutneys for the homemade Samosas

Yesterday, I had posted about a wonderful samosa recipe I had come across at U.S. Masala. This amazing blog has a bunch of wonderful recipes that I so want to try. Why perusing this space, I found a recipe for a Green Chutney as well as a Tamarind and Date Chutney, both of which can be used as accompaniments for a large variety of chaat and Indian snacks. I was very pleased with how both of these turned out, just the way I like it. These are going to be my “Go To” recipes for now. And it’ll not be easy to knock these off their spot.

Green Chutney (Pudiney (mint) ki chutney)

1 cup fresh coriander leaves, packed
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves
2 cloves garlic
1/2 tsp cumin powder (I suggest you roast some cumin seeds and crush them on the spot – its a lot more flavorful that way)
2 green chillies
1-2 tsp lemon juice
Salt, to taste
Blend all the ingredients till you get a smooth paste. 
Adjust salt and lemon to taste.
You can decant it in a clean glass bottle and refrigerate if you aren’t using it immediately.
Tamarind and Date Chutney (Imli ki chutney)
Makes about 1/2 cup
3 tbsp tamarind pulp
3 tbsp dates, pitted and chopped
1/2 cup jaggery, roughly chopped
2 cups water
1 tsp salt
1 tsp red chilly powder
1/2 tsp fennel powder
1 tsp roasted cumin powder
1/4 tsp black salt
In a heavy bottomed pan on medium heat, place the tamarind pulp and water and mix well. 
Add the dates and let it come to a boil.
Lower the heat to medium low and add the jaggery and mix. Let it cook on medium to medium low till the jaggery melts and the sauce reduces to half, stirring regularly.
Add the salt and all the spice powders and mix well. 
Cook for about 2-3 minutes and turn the heat off when it gets to a ketchup like consistency. Keep in mind that this sauce will thicken as it cools.
Cool down to room temperature and store in a clean and dry glass bottle and refrigerate till you need to use it. It keeps for weeks, if it lasts that long 🙂

Bombay Street Food Special #7 – Homemade Samosas

Samosas are a big hit in my family. None of us have made it ever, but everyone enjoys this yummy snack piping hot. A couple of weeks ago, I got ambitious and decided to finally try making some on my own, complete with homemade condiments. It takes a while to get everything in place. But what I absolutely love about this recipe is that the chutneys can be made ahead and refrigerated and they keep well. That saves a considerable amount of time when you do make the samosas. If you want to take a shorter cut, you can simply serve these samosas with some tomato ketchup. I was really excited when I found the complete set of recipes for the crust, filling and the chutneys at U.S. Masala. And I’ve got to tell you that these recipes did not disappoint. They are definite keepers, though I don’t know when I will make these again. It will have to be once  the rains kick in. There’s no way I will try this again during this insane summer we are experiencing. Getting back to the Samosas, if the weather in your part of the world is slightly more bearable than ours is, go ahead and try making these.

Samosas


For the crust – 
1 cup all purpose flour
1 1/2 tbsp semolina
3 tbsp oil
1/4 tsp carom seeds
1/2 tsp salt, or to taste
1/4 cup water

In a mixing bowl, mix the flour, semolina, oil, carom seeds and salt. Make sure the oil is well incorporated in the dough.

Using the water knead the ingredients to a smooth, pliable yet firm dough. Knead for about 5 minutes.

Cover with a damp cloth and set aside for about half an hour.

For the filling – 
4 large potatoes, boiled, peeled, cut into small cubes (about 2 cups)
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/2 tsp red chilly powder
1 tsp cumin seeds
1/4 tsp fennel seeds
1 green chilly, chopped finely
2 tsp coriander powder
1 tsp garam masala powder
2 tsp amchur powder
Salt to taste
2 tbsp oil
A pinch of asafoetida
1 tbsp fresh coriander leaves, chopped
Oil for deep frying

Heat the 2 tbsp oil in a pan. Add the asafoetida, cumin and fennel seeds and let them sputter. Make sure it doesn’t burn.

Add the green chillies and stir for about a minute.

Add the turmeric and coriander powders and salt and stir well for a couple of minutes.

Add the potatoes, stir well and cook for about 5 minutes.

Add the red chilly powder, garam masala and amchur. Mix thoroughly and add the coriander leaves.

Stir well and remove from the heat and let the mixture come to room temperature.

To make the samosas – 


Keep a small bowl of water at room temperature at hand.

Divide the dough into 6-7 portions slightly larger than the size of a golf ball.

Roll each portion into a disc and cut into half. This will give you two semicircles.

Working with one semicircle at a time, moisten the straight edge and bring opposite ends together to form a cone, making sure you press the edges firmly to seal them.

Spoon some of the filling into the cone taking care not to over fill.

Moisten the rounded edge and close the cone and press the edges of the dough together sealing it well.

Continue till you’ve made all the samosas.

Heat oil in a wok for deep frying. You can test the temperature of the oil by placing a small ball of dough in the oil. It should sit at the bottom for a few seconds and then float to the top. If it doesn’t float to the top, the oil isn’t hot enough. If it rises to the top instantly, the oil is too hot.

When the oil is heated right, deep fry the samosas till they turn golden brown on both sides, carefully flipping them over when one side is cooked.

Serve hot with tomato ketchup or some green chutney and some tamarind chutney.

Stay tuned for those recipes tomorrow.

UPDATE: You can now find the recipes for the Green Mint Chutney or Pudiney ki chutney and the Date and Tamarind Chutney or Imli ki Chutney here.

This recipe is linked to –
Savory Sunday
My Meatless Mondays
Mix it up Monday
Mangia Mondays
Mouthwatering Monday

Bombay Street Food Special #6 – Aloo Cheese Frankies – Mumbai Style

As promised yesterday, today I’m going to share with you a meatless version of the delicious frankie – The Aloo Cheese Frankie. Potatoes and cheese – to me that’s a match made in heaven.

Check out the post on the Chicken Frankie for the naan roti recipe and instructions on how to assemble the frankie.

Aloo Cheese Frankies


For the Aloo Cheese filling – 


2 potatoes, boiled, peeled and mashed
Salt, to taste
1/8 tsp chilly powder
A pinch of cumin powder
A pinch of turmeric powder
A pinch of amchur powder (dried mango powder)

Mix all the ingredients well. Check for seasoning and adjust if needed.

Here are the details on the recipe for the roti and the frankie assembly.

UPDATE: One thing I’ll probably try out the next time I make this, is I’ll make a long sausage of the mashed potato filling and lightly fry it off on a pan and then use it in the roll. I would love to see how that works out.

Bombay Street Food Special #5 – Chicken Frankies – Mumbai Style

Chicken frankies are yet another version of a chicken wrap, but yeah, Mumbai style. I don’t know what it is about wraps, but a lot of cuisines seem to have a version of their own. The Americans have the ever so versatile Wrap, the Mexicans have the burrito, the Asians have the spring roll, the Italians the calzone. In India we call wraps Frankies. It is another version of street food. Its not uncommon to see stalls around the city selling these wraps piping hot. Today, I’m going to show you how to make one from scratch in the comfort of your own home.

The street stalls have many varieties on offer. The Chicken, Mutton, Veg., Aloo, Egg are just a few. Then you also have the option of adding cheese to these wraps. And we know cheese makes everything better. I made a couple of these this time around – the chicken one for the meat lovers and the potato or Aloo version for those of you who don’t eat meat. We love them both. Today I will focus on the Chicken Frankie and stay tuned for the meatless version tomorrow.
Chicken Frankie

For the naan roti –
Makes 8 

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup wheat flour
1 tsp salt
4 tsp oil
2-3 eggs, whisked well
Mix the ingredients except the beaten egg in a bowl and using water, bind to a soft, pliable dough.
Divide into portions and roll out into a disk about 6″ in diameter. Make sure you don’t roll it out too thin. At the same time, it shouldn’t be too thick either.
Place it on a hot griddle or pan. Apply a few drops of oil on the top and spread it lightly using the back of a spoon. 
Turn it over. Spread a couple of spoons of the whisked egg on this side. (Some vendors use 1 beaten egg for every roll, you may use as much or as little egg as you like. I find about 2 spoons or whisked egg works fairly well.)
Once the egg has slightly set, turn over and cook on this side as well.
Once both the sides have cooked well, take off the pan and keep aside.
Note: I usually cook off all the rotis and keep aside. You don’t want to overcook it, since it needs to be warmed up again, just before you assemble. If you’re just making a couple of these, you can assemble them straight on at this stage.
For the filling – 
250g boneless chicken, cut into small pieces
1 onion, finely chopped
2 tomatoes, finely chopped
5 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
1″ ginger, finely chopped or grated
1 – 1 1/2 tsp amchur powder (dried mango powder)
1 tsp red chilly powder
1 tsp garam masala powder
1/2 tsp coriander powder
1/2 tsp cumin powder
Salt, to taste
2 tbsp oil
1 tbsp fresh mint leaves, chopped
4-5 tbsp fresh coriander leaves, chopped
Heat oil in a pan. Add the ginger and garlic and saute for a minute or so.
Add the chopped onion and fry off till the onion turns golden brown.
Add the chilly, garam masala, coriander and cumin powders and stir well.
Add the tomatoes and stir fry till the spices and tomatoes cook. The oil will start to separate around the edges of the vessel. The tomatoes should lose some of its moisture by now.
Add the chicken pieces and fry off, stirring well. You may add a tiny bit of water to cook it further. You need a moist filling, not a runny one. (I had some leftover chicken that was marinaded and gently cooked. To make you own, check out this post. Since the chicken was already cooked, I simply shredded the chicken and cooked it till it warmed through and absorbed all the flavors. You can add a tiny bit of stock or water if it seems too dry.)
Once the chicken has cooked, add the amchur powder, fresh chopped coriander and mint leaves and salt. Mix well. Taste and adjust seasoning, if needed.
Keep aside.
Onion salad mix – 
1 onion, finely chopped
A pinch of salt
1/4 tsp. chilly powder
A few drops lemon juice
Some fresh coriander leaves, chopped
Mix all the ingredients.
I usually keep the coriander leaves aside and use it as a garnish.
To assemble the frankies – 
Chaat masala
Cheese, grated

If you’ve made your rotis in advance. Place them on a pan and gently warm them up. 
Spoon some of the filling onto the roti. 
Sprinkle some of the onion salad on it. 
Sprinkle lightly with some chaat masala if desired.
Sprinkle some grated cheese, if you’re making a cheese version.
Top with some fresh chopped coriander leaves.
Wrap it up nice and tight and serve hot.
Here’s what they look like all done – 
Left – Aloo Cheese frankie
Right – Chicken Cheese frankie
Check back tomorrow for the Aloo Cheese version.
This recipe is linked to – 
A Little Birdie Told Me
Hearth and Soul