Spicy Kerala Mango Pickle – An Instant Mango Pickle

Today we’re going to talk pickles. No, not the bread and butter pickles or the dill pickle kind. We’re talking Indian pickles. Pickles form a huge part of Indian cuisine. As vast as India is as a country, even more diverse is the food that comes from all different parts. Every region has its own culture, language, cuisine and hence versions of pickles. I have always been a very picky pickle person. (Haha, theres a mouthful of a sentence). Anyway, there are some pickles I just can’t deal with (most of these being the spicy store bought ones) but there are others I can’t get enough of.

Pickle making has always intimidated me. I always thought of it as a tedious and daunting process. I guess some of this anxiety with pickle making also comes from my Mum. She makes some  mean pickles, but inspite of every care, can never get them to last. They’d get spoiled before we could finish them. I always thought that would happen to me too. Don’t ask me why, I just thought it would. Until I tried my first homemade pickle – this super yummy Goan Eggplant Pickle. I was surprised at how easy it was to make and we enjoyed it for months after.

I was eager to try out a few more recipes after my success with the eggplant pickle. So a few months ago, when raw mangoes started showing up around Sydney, I just had to try out some mango pickles. Some Indian pickle recipes are long drawn and need to be kept in the sun. I wanted something a little quicker. So, I picked up a few green mangoes at Paddy’s Market in Flemington and I narrowed it down to two recipes to try out this time around. One of them was this Instant Mango Pickle. Ofcourse, seeing that it was an instant recipe was a huge bonus. Plus it was so easy to make, I couldn’t not try it. Also this is a small batch recipe, which was fantastic, because we’re a family of 2 and I had more recipes to try out. I chose to wait for a few months before sharing this recipe, because I wanted to see if it would keep. And I’m happy to report that if you use a clean, dry glass bottle and a clean and dry fork / spoon to serve, this keeps refrigerated for more than 4 months. Moreover, this is a delicious spice blend, unlike those you will find in any store-bought version. I happen to really like this recipe. I’d take that as a win for me and my pickle making.

Spicy Kerala Mango Pickle
Recipe from: Edible Garden

2 cups raw mango, skin on, cut into uniform sized cubes
2 tbsp salt
1/4 cup oil
2 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds
2 springs curry leaves (leaves only)
2-3 tsp red chilly powder
2 tsp vinegar (optional)

Add salt to the cut mango pieces. Toss well and keep aside for 20-30 minutes.

Combine 2 tsp mustard seeds and the fenugreek seeds and grind them to a coarse powder together.

After the mango pieces have been sitting in the salt for 30 minutes, heat oil in the pan and add 1/2 tsp mustard seeds.

When the mustard seeds pop, turn the flame off. Add the powdered mustard and fenugreek.

Immediately add the curry leaves and the red chilly powder and stir well for about 5 seconds.

Tip in the salted mangoes and add the vinegar, if using.

Stir well. The residual heat of the pan will cook the pickle through as needed.

Let the pickle cool down completely in the pan itself.

Once it has completely cooled, store in a clean, dry glass bottle / jar.

Store refrigerated.

Enjoy!!!

**Serve with your favorite dal and rice.

This recipe has been added to –
Food on Friday @ Carole’s Chatter

Eggplant Pickle

For years now, I’ve envied folks that can make good pickles. In our home we always enjoy a good pickle, but that is one thing my mother never made much of, when we were growing up. She had a few good recipes but seldom made them. She made a real good green chilly pickle and a Goan pickle using prawns and another one using fish. So most of the time we ended up using store bought pickle. We didn’t have a choice really. I didn’t care much for the store bought variety, expect for a certain kind we got in Goa, but those trips usually happened once a year.

Then one year, a dear friend of mine had to visit her aunt who lived an hour and a half away from where we lived and she asked me to go with her. At lunch, she served up a home made eggplant pickle that I fell in love with. I must have been about 16 years old then, so it never really occurred to me to ask her how she made it, nor did I have access to the tonnes of information that is accessible on the internet in today’s day and age. But over the years, I’d think about that wonderful pickle and often wondered if I would every find something similar again.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago. I got a fantastic deal on some eggplant and picked up a couple of large ones. I originally thought I’d grill it and store it in some olive oil with some herbs. But I ran out of time and it got to the stage where we were to leave for our holiday the very next day. What I haven’t told you yet is that a few weeks prior to that I came across a recipe for a Goan eggplant pickle, which I glanced at and moved on without making much of it. Since grilling and preserving the eggplant in such a short time frame was out of the question, I thought about that recipe and dug around for it.

I was a little sceptical since I’d never made a pickle before. But I figured I had nothing to lose but trying my hand at it this once. I always thought it was a daunting process. I was amazed at how simple this recipe was. A few spices, a little cooking and a week of maturing. We got back from our holiday to a really fabulous pickle. Very similar to my friend’s aunt’s version. This recipe is a keeper. I made a few changes to the recipe and the one below, reflects those changes. It’s safe to say that I’m very happy with this first attempt and can’t wait to try out some more as and when we need to replenish our stock. This pickle is mildly spiced and sweet at the same time and is a wonderful accompaniment to a simple dal and rice or any meal really. šŸ™‚

Eggplant Pickle
Adapted from: Erica’s Yummy Food


2 large eggplants
20 cloves of garlic
2 pieces of ginger, each about 3″ long
1 tbsp kasoori methi (dried fenugreek leaves)
1 tsp cumin seeds
12 cloves
4 tsp red chilly powder
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup oil
2 heaping tsp mustard seeds
A handful of curry leaves
4 1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Prep a glass bottle but thoroughly washing and making sure it is completely dry. (You could use mason jars if you like.) Any moisture on the bottle will result in your pickle going bad. It will get moudly and you wont be able to eat it. I simply place the bottle in a dishwasher and it is perfectly washed and bone dry.

Cut the eggplant into cubes (about 1/2″).

Sprinkle the eggplant with 4 tsp of salt and toss well. Set this aside for 2 hours.

You can now prep the rest of your ingredients, while you wait for the eggplant to discard all the excess moisture.

Peel and roughly chop the ginger and garlic.

Using a mixer / food processor, grind the ginger, garlic, fenugreek leaves, cumin seeds, cloves, red chilly powder, turmeric powder and vinegar to a paste.

After 2 hours, you will notice that the eggplant has released a lot of moisture. Drain all the liquid from the eggplants and gently squeeze the eggplant to get rid of any liquid. You want to be gentle and let the cubes retain their shape but still discard and excess liquid.

Heat the oil in a large pan. Lower the heat to a medium low.

Add the mustard seeds and let them sputter.

When they are sputtering, carefully add the curry leaves.

Add the spice paste and cook on a low to medium heat for 10 minutes. But cooking the paste first, you are left with a mellow flavour and not a sharp tartness of the vinegar. Stir frequently.

Add the eggplant cubes and cook for another 10 minutes. Stir gently every now and then to mix well, but be careful to not break down the eggplant pieces. After cooking for 10 minutes,  the eggplant cubes should be tender but will still somewhat retain their shape and not be too mushy.

Add the sugar to the pan and cook for another 5 minutes and now you will see the oil separating at the sides of the pan.

Take off the heat and spoon the hot pickle into the prepared glass bottles. Cover the bottle and leave it on your counter to cool. (Bottling it when it is still hot creates a vacuum when the mix cools and ensures your pickle has a good shelf life.)

When it has completely cooled, you can store it in the fridge. I left mine to mature for a week while we were away.

Enjoy!!!

Now, do your pickle loving self a favour and try this recipe out soon. You can thank me later. šŸ™‚

Pickled JalapeƱos

I was going through one of my favorite blogs a while ago, The Purple Foodie and I saw a homemade version of pickled jalapeƱos. I was thrilled because I really love jalapeƱo peppers in a sandwich, a salad and sometimes I just serve it as an accompaniment with the meal itself and that is exactly what I did for the Barbecue party that we had some time ago. Since we had kids over, I couldn’t spice up the salads as much as I normally do. So I left out the green chillies and simply served a bowl of pickled jalapeƱos along with the meal. That way anyone who wanted a little extra punch simply added some to their salads. Anyway, I made a jar of this some time ago. They were super yum, and if say so myself, so much better than the store bought variety. The best part is that I know exactly what is in the jar, since its made from scratch. Also, the peppers taste better with time, thats if it lasts that long. The recipe is simple and easy and can be made way ahead of time. If you love pickled jalapeƱos as much as I do, give this a try. You won’t regret it.

Pickled JalapeƱos

330g JalapeƱo peppers, sliced
1 tbsp. pepper corns
1 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. coarse sea salt
2 bay leaves
3 cloves of garlic, dashed under the flat blade of a knife
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup water

Place the sliced jalapeƱos in a glass jar.

Place the rest of the ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 5 minutes.

Let the brine cool a little but while its still hot pour over the jalapeƱos in the jar and let it rest for a few hours.

Cove the jar and shake a little to distribute the spices evenly.

I keep the jar refrigerated so that it lasts longer.

Note: If you are pickling a different quantity of jalapeƱos, all you need to to is wash the whole peppers and place them in the glass jar you will be storing the pickle in. Fill it with water. Measure the quantity of water used and substitute half the quantity of water for the apple cider vinegar and add the spices.

This recipe is linked to –
Meatless Mondays @ Midnight Maniac
Mouthwatering Mondays @ A Southern Fairytale
Meatless Mondays @ My Sweet and Savory
Whats Cooking Thursday @ Feeding Four
Decidedly Healthy or Horridly Decadent @ Ceo a’s draiocht
Fun with Food Friday @ Paisley Passions